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The 17th Annual Delsys Prize Winner: Ms. Shriya Srinivasan

26 Nov 2019

Congratulations to Shriya Srinivasan, winner of the 2019 Delsys Prize!

ADInstruments is proud to support the Delsys Prize for Innovation in Electromyography (EMG) and we are pleased to congratulate the 17th Annual Prize winner: Ms. Shriya Srinivasan of the Harvard-MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology.

Ms. Shriya Srinivasan,winner of the 2019Delsys Prize.

Ms. Shriya Srinivasan, winner of the 2019 Delsys Prize.

Ms. Srinivasan’s winning proposal, titled, ''Empowering the EMG Signal Source’: Agonist-Antagonist Myoneural Interfaces for Neuroprosthetic Control,” was selected from a field of 182 entries from 34 countries.

Ms. Srinivasan is a doctoral candidate studying biomedical engineering at the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology program. Her current research in Dr. Hugh Herr's Biomechatronics group focuses on improving the interface between man and synthetic devices to help individuals with neurological injuries regain function.

Of the award, Shriya says ‘Research is more than a career for me - scientific inquiry and solving engineering challenges are something I consider to be an integral part of my life. It is an honor to be recognized by the foundation for something that is indeed a labor of love. I felt privileged to be in the ranks of such extraordinary scientists and engineers!’

About Ms. Srinivasan's Research

'My research focuses on neural interfaces:  improving the interface between man and synthetic devices such that neural signals can be seamlessly transmitted to and from the human being. In the current day, my research will help those who have had a neurological injury regain function. In the future, I’m hoping that these interfaces will help us better understand the way in which the nervous system works. Insight on human neural control has long been a goal for mankind and neural interfaces will enable their dissection in the future.'

Shriya explains how her research has the potential to improve the lives of millions of amputees worldwide. ‘For persons undergoing amputation today, there’s very little attention focused towards ''rewiring'' their peripheral neuromusculature. This means that important communication lines to other muscles and nerves, as well as the central nervous system are broken or lost. This has a tremendous impact on their neurological health as well as their ability to control the advanced prostheses that are becoming available on the market today. '

'The regenerative agonist-antagonist myoneural interface (AMI) will “give a voice” to orphaned nerves and enable better neural interfacing with prostheses, and hopefully improve their ability to move and interact with the environment.’

When asked if she had a scientific hero or someone who has inspired her along her academic journey, Shriya replied with,  'I wouldn’t call him a hero, but I’ve been fascinated with da Vinci. His philosophy on the sophistication of simplicity, artful scientific inquiry, and life’s work are a marvel and source of inspiration.' 

Related: Celebrating 500 years of da Vinci - The science behind the paintings

As part of her prize, Shriya will receive a US 3,000 monetary award, a complete NeuroMap System including Trigno Galileo and Avanti sensors, as well as a license to our LabChart analysis software.
More about the Delsys Prize »

Congratulations again Shriya, from all of us here at ADInstruments - we have no doubt we will be hearing more about your scientific achievements in the near future!

For more information about Shriya’s innovative work - check out her TedX talk: Integrating man and machine to reinstate a sense of feeling.


Do you also have an interest in EMG?

Delsys Inc. are well known for their advanced wireless motion technology and wearable solutions, bringing together ease-of-use, clever design and sophisticated underlying algorithms for accurate EMG, EKG and FSR measurements in movement science.

 

Our systems combine the Trigno wireless movement technology from Delsys with the powerful analysis capability of LabChart software, for a deeper understanding of the intricacies of movement.
See our full range of wireless EMG solutions here.

By Mel Knottenbelt

Scientific Writer

ADInstruments